Friday, 24 July 2015

Ancient Traditions, a Monk's Magic, and what happens next...


Durstan and Ailan's story in The Monk who Cast a Spell continues in Book 2 at a place near Lindisfarne; and the ancient festival of Lughnasadh (also known as Lughnasa or Lammas) begins at sunset on 31st July. It's an important date for my characters in 800 AD...



The feast is traditionally named after Lugh, the Celtic God of light, and takes place at a time when the Sun God, Lugh's father, transfers his power into the grain for it to ripen. This is then made into the 1st bread of the season, which is often laid on a Church altar. It also marks the beginning of the Sun's descent into the darkness of winter; the sacrifice needed for the balance of the seasons.




Durstan is torn still between his belief in the Christian God and the Old Gods of his Ancestors, as are many people at that time; whilst Ailan continues resolutely to follow the Goddess Brigid. It creates conflict in plot, but all agree that it is unwise to offend any of the Gods, in such a precarious time as the 8th century.

I have enjoyed writing about this; discovering what happens next to the Monk and other characters in Book 1. There are a few surprises to look forward to, which I certainly didn't expect, but which seem natural now to the continuance of the tale...



And I moved house last week! You can read one of the articles I wrote Meet my Nemesis ~ Books about decluttering my previous home,  and which is published in issue 4 of Kishboo Magazine. 

I have also finished compiling my 1st poetry Anthology, "From Now 'til Then", and will shortly be chatting to +Marilyn Chapman on the Hope and Dreams blog. More about that later...



If you follow the ancient traditions, I hope you have a great Lughnasa and, for everyone, that you have much to be thankful for in the 1st harvest of the year. 

Thank you for visiting the Hope and Dreams blog.